5 Month Old FFA Show Steer Set on Fire at High School’s Agriculture Barn

This steer was part of the Paso Robles High School FFA show steers. Someone broke into their Agriculture Barn and set this steer on fire. He was found like this 15 hours later when his owner came to feed him.

Photo Credit: ksby.com

I am sitting in my anatomy and physiology lab right now, preparing for my lab practical that I will be taking in precisely 25 minutes. I stopped to give myself a little Facebook break, we all know they are deserving, and I find a good friend posting this story about a five-month-old steer that someone set on fire. 

I had just taken the time to write a letter on this post to the monster who thought that this was something worth doing. Whoever you are, disgusting doesn’t even begin to touch what I feel about you. I then realize, being the psychology major that I am who has an intense interest in studying criminals and sociopaths and psychopaths and serial killers, that it is probably a terrible idea to put so much energy and effort into making his crimes known and detailing them. Serial killers, sociopaths, psychopaths, etc. get a sort of “high” when they realize they are getting attention and “famous” and also a lot more dangerous. I am using these serious labels because normally those are the only people who would do such a monstrous act.  So, that being said, I ask you agriculture and agvocate friends one thing: spread this page around and let us use our intensely amazing powers of networking to help police find out any information that we can about the piece of trash who put a 5 month old calf through Hell.

Again, here is the link for the story:

Local FFA Student’s Steer Set on Fire

Please, please let’s join together to help catch the son of a _______ who did this. On that note, I need to get back to studying so I can graduate and help capture people like this scum of the earth and put them away for the rest of their life.

Thoughts and prayers go to this calf and his struggle back to recovery as well as his owner and family.

Tens of Thousands of Cattle Dead Due to Winter Storm Atlas

Dead carcasses lay along US Highways 212 & 34. Courtesy of Kristina Barker, Rapid City Journal

Dead carcasses lay along US Highways 212 & 34. Courtesy of Kristina Barker, Rapid City Journal

A lot of things have changed since I last posted a year ago. For one, I no longer am at Colorado State University as an Animal Science and Equine Science double major, to my heart’s dismay. I am now at Boise State University and studying Psychology with a minor in Biology so I can go on to acquire my masters and doctorate in Neuropsychology. I still have the pup and love of agriculture though, so don’t you fret. No matter how hard psychology will try, there is no way anyone or anything can take the love of cattle and agriculture and the people who make up it’s wonderful world away from me. I swear I am one of the few and the proud who rock my Tony’s on campus. And I wouldn’t ever think of being ashamed of it.

Anyways…

I return, after a long hiatus, to make a post that is not full of excitement. To be quite frank and direct, I wish I didn’t feel the aching in my heart to post in Rancher’s Daughter because that would mean that I could go back to studying for my anatomy and physiology lab quiz that I have tomorrow about human bones. However, this is something I could not simply ignore.

Enter: Winter Storm Atlas. Mother Nature apparently let her wrath go on Western South Dakota these past few days. And I do not say that in a joking or over exaggerate matter. Reports have been coming to light about a very heavy snowfall that came on in lightning speeds. Literally feet of snow was dumped on the Dakota plains and it is going to take an astronomical toll, emotionally, physically, and financially, on the ranchers that make up it’s population. I first read about Atlas in Rapid City Journal’s piece that was published today (October 8th, 2013). My heart ached and then broke into a million pieces. Ten’s of thousands of cattle are dead because of this storm. Tens of thousands. And, that isn’t even close to a final number yet.

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Photos of Winter Storm Atlas Casualties- WARNING! GRAPHIC IMAGES!

All of the below pictures are from Big Balls In Cow Town

These images are graphic and contain images of dead cattle. However, in my opinion, they are important to share as they are the damages that the ranchers of this devastating storm are having to face. See my original post about Winter Storm Atlas for more background.

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I’m back!

Let me tell you, moving every once in a blue moon is a total pain that throws the largest wrench of disorder into my never-on-time-and-always-scatterbrained lifestyle I live. So you can imagine my mental clarity when I mention how moving three times in two weeks can really fog up a person’s to-do list. Thank goodness for Apple and the billions of apps that are catered towards minds like mine who battle ADHD on a daily basis, or I would lose my head if it wasn’t screwed on tightly. I apologize for the long hiatus that was not on purpose, but I have at least three post ideas that will probably just all be published this week. Again, sorry for the long break! I am still getting settled so there will not be a tentative schedule, because we all know that even if I was settled, I would still be late for something! Thanks for the patience and I have the best readers in the world!

 

Shelby!

Why I AGvocate- A college cowgirl’s perspective

Before you read any further I strongly suggest you go read what another AGvocate’s personal reasoning behind blogging and advocating for agriculture. Judi Graff is an excellent role model to all of us in the AGvocate world and her post can be found here on AgChat’s website.

My back story in agriculture is one thing, but my back story in social media and AGvocating is young. I started this blog because I wanted to take a photojournalism approach and bring the stories, traditions, personalities, and histories of the people who produce and provide the food for this growing population. But, life happened and things came up and my original idea for my blog was put on the back burner. However, I knew in my mind that what I wanted to do was still possible but I had to be flexible and change my approach because agriculture and those who oppose it weren’t going to change their approach to fit my idea. So, it was back to the drawing board and I rearranged my game plan then switched out my tactical plan.

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Being a Ram Taught Me…

The Oval at Colorado State University.

Making the decision to leave Colorado State University and it’s Animal Science program was easily one of the hardest I’ve ever had to make. I hate the fact that I am leaving not only friends behind but professors who helped me through tough times, classes that are a dime a dozen, and an environment that I really felt I belonged in. Fort Collins is a town that has everything that I could ask for. It integrated agriculture in with athletics and not to mention a community both rich in history and Ram pride. Given multiple personal situations home is where I need to be right now. Boise is where my family is and I need to be there to give support as best as I can and not miss out on things. I gave it a good run and who knows? Maybe CSU hasn’t completely gotten rid of me just yet. So as I hang up the gold and green towel I have to remember that another journey is ahead of me. I cannot admit that I will be completely getting rid of the agriculture in me because I’m pretty sure you can’t survive without blood in your veins. So I will still be on the front lines of AGvocating because I hear every day that young people are needed, so that’s what I’m here for. Just be sure not to forget that this cowgirl exists😉

Because of the experiences I’ve made and had at CSU, I thought it’d be fitting if I broke down some important lessons that I learned here, agriculture related or not.

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New Addition: Thoughtful Thursdays

Announcing a new addition to The Rancher’s Daughter: Thoughtful Thursdays! Basically I have taken my love (obsession) with psychology and intermeshed it with my love (obsession) for agriculture. Since I decided that moving back to Boise was the best idea for me at the time, I have had this intense feeling of loss because Boise State doesn’t have an agriculture program. So, naturally I went with my other natural instinct: psychology. But, living a life were one is non-existent makes me sick to my stomach, I am set to figure out a way to have the best of both worlds. It then occurred to me that I have an incredible gift that can channel and explain things about agriculture and our perceptions of them, as well as the opposing side’s own viewpoints. So, I hereby declare every Thursday (okay, not EVERY Thursday, but most) Thoughtful Thursday in which we will dive into the depths of the agriculture brain and try and play connect the dots. There is a good chance that I am the only one fascinated by this idea, but it’ll be here and you can take what you want and leave the rest.

 

Shelby